Nov 30

The layers of an effective kneetap offense

The underhook half guard without a strong knee tap would be a sad and dreary thing.

Yes, you still have the kneebar, triangle, shovel sweep, and backtake, but understanding the mechanics of executing the kneetap and going for it with gusto opens the door for so much offense.

I would even say that having a great kneetap makes everything you do in the underhook half easier.

Case in point:

Opponents will commonly snap a strong overhook on you when you get to the underhook position and then try to flatten you The underhook half guard without a strong knee tap would be a sad and dreary thing.

Yes, you still have the kneebar, triangle, shovel sweep, and backtake, but understanding the mechanics of executing the kneetap and going for it with gusto opens the door for so much offense.

I would even say that having a great kneetap makes everything you do in the underhook half easier.

Case in point:

Opponents will commonly snap a strong overhook on you when you get to the underhook position and then try to flatten you out by driving into you. In that moment, there are many opportunities, but if you go for the kneetap first, you will magnify their response and make even easier to roll through for the shovel sweep, jump up for the triangle, swing through for the backtake.

There’s even a whole offensive sequence that flows from the kneetap based entirely on how opponents will try to stop the sweep.

And how, oh how, will those dastardly fiends attempt to stop your glorious sweep?

Let us count the fiendish ways:

  • They’ll base out by moving their outside knee far away so you can’t reach it.
  • They’ll step their outside leg up and close the path to the sweep with solid base.
  • They’ll snap the overhook on you and pressure down to threaten the armbar.
  • They’ll post on your shoulder and weaken your control by creating separation.
  • They’ll drive into you hard to force you flat.
  • They’ll frame against your neck and commit outright underhook theft in broad daylight.

…..those bastards.

But I got something for them.

Some of those responses are exactly what I want for hitting the triangle, backtake, shovel sweep, and for finishing the kneetap in more dominant fashion.

And you know what?

Elements of that strategy are already covered in my half guard course, and more are the way. In fact, I’ll be taping today. Plan to add some demonstrations that show the systems of offense in quick little bits for review and study.

It’ll be all found here soon enough: