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Jan 03

Brazilian Jiu-jitsu Teaching Experiment III

pinit fg en rect gray 20 Brazilian Jiu jitsu Teaching Experiment III

After I finished that last post on training acceleration, I couldn’t wait to apply the idea. The first opportunity I had to do so was a No-Gi Advanced class I taught at Crazy 88.

Beforehand, I decided that I was going to give them one of the most developed tools in my arsenal. It was a basic attack from half guard, but it has so many layers of complexity.  My goal was to demonstrate that by focusing on the entries and the execution.

I even took some time to write out a conceptual blueprint for the class, and I’ll share that with you.

Class Structure

  • Warmup – 10 minutes
  • Technical Instruction and Practice – 45 minutes
  • Situational Rolling – 35 Minutes

Conceptual Blueprints

I’m going to share two blueprints with you. One I wrote real quick shortly before class, and the other I wrote afterward for a future class down the road. Let’s see if you can tell the which one was written first.

Who is listening?

  • Advanced Students at Crazy 88 (Mostly blue belts)

Step I – Outcome: By the end of this class, they will….

  • Understand that basic attacks can be made more effective by improving entries and developing set reactions for your opponent’s counters.

In order to achieve this they need to know:

  • How it can be done by seeing a clear example of entries, initiation, and execution

In order to achieve this they need to feel:

  • Excited about looking at their own skill set in the same framework.

Step II – Relevance: Why should they care?

  • Because if you make your basic attacks more effective, it will create more opportunities to use more advanced techniques as well.
  • Because thinking about your technique in this way may inspire innovation.
  • Because figuring out how to make basic attacks work will increase your conceptual understanding of why they work.

Step III – Point: What’s your message in one sentence?

  • Even the most basic of attacks can have layers of complexity.

 

 

Who is listening?

  • Advanced Students at Crazy 88 (Mostly blue belts)

Step I – Outcome: By the end of this class, they will….

  • Use underhook half guard because it’s effective.

In order to achieve this they need to know:

  • Entries into the positions from bad situations
  • The concepts and movements that define the technique
  • Common reactions and how to counter them.

In order to achieve this they need to feel:

  • Excited about trying out the technique during rolling.

Step II – Relevance: Why should they care?

  • Because half guard is the bridge between many positions
  • Because  focusing on the entries and execution will give them a far more effective technique
  • Because the technique I’m teaching has been battle tested.

Step III – Point: What’s your message in one sentence?

  • Even the most basic of attacks can have layers of complexity.

Technical Instruction and Practice

The first thing I taught was the technique itself. After drilling that, I started adding entries from similar situations. Kept it simple though and only showed three.

After that, we moved on to dealing with common reactions. Again, I kept it to only three, but I included a bonus trick.

Now the advantage to using this format is that they got many reps in on the basic technique. So even if they only pick up one or two of the entries or tricks, the basic form is still being reinforced.

Situational Rolling

The rest of the class was all situational.

The position was set to a neutral half guard position. The goal on top was to pass or submit, while the person on bottom had to focus on sweep or submit. There was no time limit, and they went until a person “won.”

After that another person would come in, and it was back to it.

Overview

It’s simple. I like this class structure, and I’m going to improve on it.

Share and Enjoy

  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Brazilian Jiu jitsu Teaching Experiment III
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Brazilian Jiu jitsu Teaching Experiment III
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Brazilian Jiu jitsu Teaching Experiment III
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Brazilian Jiu jitsu Teaching Experiment III
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Brazilian Jiu jitsu Teaching Experiment III
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Brazilian Jiu jitsu Teaching Experiment III
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Brazilian Jiu jitsu Teaching Experiment III
  • wp socializer sprite mask 32px Brazilian Jiu jitsu Teaching Experiment III

2 comments

  1. The Ghost

    I see you had 35 minutes of situational rolling. What do you find more effective for a student to make progress? Situational rolling so the student can drill the same situation over and over, or rounds of rolling starting from a neutral position so the student can also figure out how to get to the position they want to work. I believe it is important to incorporate both but I wanted your opinion as to the amount of time dedicated to each in an hour or hour and a half class.

    1. Kenneth Brown

      I think you answered your own question. Training doesn’t have to be a zero sum game. Different methods have different benefits. That’s why it’s good to mix it up.

      I like situational rolling though because it gives opportunity for specific techniques to be worked against resistance over and over again.

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